Back on the Smack Tour – Stan Slap talks Music

Back on the Smack Tour – Stan Slap talks Music

I’m so sick of musicians and their wretched excesses. Wretched healthy excesses, I mean. The more any great artist improves their personal condition, the more their professional work tumbles in bland decline. It never fails: They get their crap together and their music goes into the toilet.

Who could deny that their emotional vulnerability, inappropriate rage, distorted perspective, egomaniacal point of view and chronic inability to manage even the simplest aspects of their lives in any rational manner... has produced some great music

Eric Clapton was on fire when he was on heroin. Bob Dylan’s greatest writing occurred when he was neurotic and reclusive. Robert Johnson, Hank Williams, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, Bon Scott, Kurt Cobain and Jerry Garcia never got it together and their music will live forever even if they clearly won’t. Charlie Parker, Lester Young and Billie Holiday were either wrecks or recovering wrecks throughout their careers and their music stayed real and deep. It’s as capable of divinely transporting us at Starbucks today as when it was originally recorded in a painful, besotted haze.

Jimmy Page got off hard drugs and recorded an album of old Led Zeppelin songs with The Black Crowes. You call that a benefit of drug-free thinking?

We love our favorite musicians and we don’t want to see them hurt themselves by no longer hurting themselves. The Who lost nut job drummer Keith Moon and who cares about anything they’ve done since? Tom Waits stopped living in lonely bachelor squalor at the Tropicana Motel with only a bottle of beer and jar of mustard in the refrigerator. He got married, moved to Sonoma, and these days his music is revered by critics—but in those days it was revered by a bunch of people who actually listened to it and bought it. At the height of their fame, Jabbaesque Blues Traveler harp player John Popper lost 200 pounds and the band has never sold more than 200 copies of any album since. The Stones are kept alive not by their music or marketing but by Keith Richards’ ongoing shtick of snorting his father’s ashes or getting his entire blood supply transfused. I like to listen to Oasis and I don’t want to hear that the Gallagher brothers are getting along at last.

It’s better to burn out than to fade away, said Neil Young -- a guy who should spend more time listening when he says things like that. Maybe if Rod Stewart had accidentally strangled himself in some humiliating attempt at sexual asphyxia back when he was in The Faces we would still be listening to him. Or at least we wouldn’t have to.

Of course, we celebrate when someone triumphs over their personal demons and demonstrates the awareness, determination and individual integrity that become life-affirming examples of the best that human beings are capable of. But not these human beings. It’s not fair, it’s not right and it’s not a very good financial return for all we’ve invested in them. Who supported their bad habits in the first place by buying their records and concert tickets when we never knew what we were going to get? It was us. They owe us.

What is the future of our music if all our favorite musicians begin living organically, raising children and getting all American Idol and corporate on us?

Thank God for Hip Hop, is all I’ve got to say.

R.I.P. Amy Winehouse

 

VIDEO: Robert Scoble Interviews Stan Slap

Stan visits the Rackspace Studios in San Francisco to talk with Robert Scoble about revolutionizing company cultures in the tech world.

Slap is renowned for achieving maximum commitment in manager, employee and customer cultures—-the three groups that decide the success of any business.

We don’t mean a bunch of managers, employees and customers. When these groups form as cultures in a company, they are far more self-protective, far more intelligent and far more resistant to standard methods of corporate influence. Our unique expertise is in understanding how these cultures work and how to work them.

From your manager culture, we will achieve emotional commitment, the source of their discretionary effort and worth more than their financial, intellectual and physical commitment combined. From your employee culture, we will get you fierce support for any strategic or performance goal: protected, course corrected and promoted to your customers. From your customer culture we will get you true brand status, allowing you to transfer sustainability of your company to your customers, who will advertise and sell for you, and step up to protect you if you stumble or get attacked. We deliver our solutions as custom consulting assignments. Since our purpose is to transfer competency to our clients, there are management development training components imbedded in our consulting process. These sessions can also be purchased on a standalone basis. In all formats, slap solutions are highest rated in many of the world’s highest rated companies —-the kinds of companies that don’t include “Patience” on their list of corporate values. No one has ever called slap work ordinary—-methods used or results achieved.

Bury My Heart at Conference Room B – The Unbeatable Impact of Truly Commited Managers

Bury My Heart at Conference Room B – The Unbeatable Impact of Truly Commited Managers

This is not a management book. This is a book for managers.

Ever have the feeling that no matter how rewarding your job is that there's an entirely different level of success and fulfillment available to you? Lingering in the mist, just out of reach…
There is, and Stan Slap is going to help you get it.

You hold in your hands the book that entirely redraws the potential of being a manager. It will show you how to gain the one competency most critical to achieving business impact, but it won't stop there. This book will put a whole new level of meaning into your job description.

You Will Never Really Work for Your Company Until Your Company Really Works for You.

Bury My Heart at Conference Room B is about igniting the massive power of any manager's emotional commitment to his or her company-worth more than financial, intellectual and physical commitment combined. Sometimes companies get this from their managers in the early garage days or in times of tremendous gain, but it's almost unheard of to get it on a sustained, self-reinforced basis.

Of course your company is only going to get it if you're willing to give it. Slap proves that emotional commitment comes from the ability to live your deepest personal values at work and then provides a remarkable process that allows you to use your own values to achieve tremendous success.

This is not soft stuff; it is the stuff of hard-core results.

Bury My Heart at Conference Room B is the highest-rated management development solution at a number of the world's highest-rated companies—companies that don't include "patience" on their list of corporate values. It has been exhaustively researched and bench tested with tens of thousands of real managers in more than seventy countries. You'll hear directly from managers about how this legendary method has transformed their careers and their lives.

As Big as It Gets Stan Slap is doing nothing less than making the business case for a manager's humanity-for every manager and the companies that depend on them. Bury My Heart at Conference Room B gives managers the urgency to change their world and the energy to do it. It will stir the soul, race the heart, and throb the foot used for acceleration.

Buckle Up. We're Going Off-Road. Slap is smart, provocative, wickedly funny and heartfelt. He fearlessly takes on some of the most cherished myths of management for the illogic they are and celebrates the experience of being a manager in all of its potential and potential weirdness. And he talks to managers like they really talk to themselves.

"This book is game changing in a way I have never seen in a business book. I learned about myself and gained new insights into the work I've been doing for thirty years. It is a spectacular read."
– John Riccitiello, CEO, Electronic Arts

1. New York Times bestseller
2. Wall St. Journal bestseller
3. USA Today bestseller
4. 800-CEO-READ best in category
5. Inc. Best of 2010 list
6. Fast Company Best of 2010 list
7. Miami Herald Top 10 business books list
8. Soundview Executive Summaries Top 30 best list
9. Booklist: starred review
10. Publisher’s Weekly: “must read”

 

 

VIDEO: How to Change Company Culture and Innovate by Steve Faktor & Stan Slap

On Steve Faktor's latest podcast (subscribe here), guest Stan Slap confirmed his findings. (slap is a corporate culture guru and fellow speaker at the BusinessNext conference.)  According to slap, “Most companies misperceive intellectual engagement for emotional engagement. It’s the emotional engagement that’s critical.” And when it comes to achieving change, slap agrees, “If you want the culture to buy it, you have to know how to sell it to them.”

View the Forbes article: The 9 Corporate Personality Types And How to Inspire Them to Innovate

IdeaFaktory Website: Episode 3: Slap out of it! How to Change Company Culture and Innovate

VIDEO: Employee Values VS Manager Values

A manager’s emotional commitment is the ultimate trigger for their discretionary effort, worth more than financial, intellectual and physical commitment combined. It’s the kind of commitment that solves unsolvable problems, creates energy when all energy has been expended and ignites emotional commitment in others, like employees, teams and customers. Emotional commitment means unchecked, unvarnished devotion to the company and its success;any legendary organizational performance is the result of emotionally committed managers.

Not everything that can be counted counts and not everything that counts can be counted, said Einstein. This is a guy who conducted early nuclear experiments on his own hair and so is perhaps not your most reliable organizational thinker; still, he had a point. The really important measurements of emotional commitment include the ones a company can’t see until managers need to show them. Ferocious support for the company when the company needs it most is one of these hidden metrics. Any manager can appear fully productive and enthusiastic simply because they’re financially, intellectually and physically committed. But if you’ve ever witnessed a human being emotionally committed to a cause—working like they’re being paid a million when they’re not being paid a dime—you know there’s a difference and you know it’s big.